the
dry-aged
Process

A finely honed skill, time-honoured and only mastered by few. Dry-ageing was the standard process used to age beef up until the 1970’s when wet-ageing, a more simple process that allows meat to age without air exposure while sealed  in vacuum-sealed bags - began to take its place.

An industry first, Haverick Meats feature the ultimate temperature and humidity-controlled dry-ageing room to provide correctly handled, expertly monitored, dry-aged beef at its peak of flavour. Prior to storing we hand-select only the very best marbled Angus-Hereford cross beef selections. Haverick Certified Dry-Aged Beef™ is stored for up to six weeks in our custom-designed dry-ageing room where a balance of time, temperature, air circulation, and humidity have been set.

Moreover the beef undergoes major change, positively impacting on flavour and tenderness as it forms an external crust and it loses up to one third of its mass due to water evaporation. Enzymes within break down and tenderise the beef, giving it its unique nutty and buttery flavour. Prior to preparation, the crusted surface is trimmed off before packaging, revealing succulent deep red beef. The extra time and care we put into ageing our beef ensures superior flavour and maximum tenderness.

See our aging Process – Aged for 5 weeks 

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  • Week 1

    Week 1

    Entire untrimmed beef primals are placed in our uniquely specified dry-ageing room, with strict temperature, humidity and air-flow controlled requirements.

    The process of dry-aging is called proteolysis, allowing the natural breakdown of muscle protein and collagen to occur in an atmospherically controlled environment. Enzymes within are released into the meat where the breakdown process begins, allowing amino acids to act on the muscle tissue, resulting in tenderisation to take place, releasing its full flavour.


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  • Week 2

    Week 2

    Over time as the primal cut is naturally exposed to the dry-age elements, the enzymes within the beef break down, in effect tenderising the beef.

    The primal’s entire mass further reduces in size as it continues to expel water into the specifically modified atmospheric environment where its unique concave shape begins.


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  • Week 3

    Week 3

    The collagen continues to break down and its moisture is pushed outwards from within its core.  The front and sides of the cut aid as a waterproof barrier with its fat and bone coverage, directing evaporation to occur from out the front and rear.Typical shrinkage is approximately 10-15% in the first three weeks.

    The outer layers of the cut continue to progressively darken and harden as total moisture levels reduce.


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  • Week 4

    Week 4

    The meat continues to further shrink as the water is expelled. The concave shape continues becomes more apparent however its fat coverage does not shrink and remains constant.

    At this point at week 4, the enzymes have played a significant role in changing the primal’s composition where the dry-aged flavour becomes clearly distinct. It is common for the aging process to cease at this point where most of the ageing process has been carried out.


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  • Week 5

    Week 5

    Depending on customer requirements and the cut of beef used, the primal can be further aged between one or two weeks in addition to its standard four week minimum period, resulting in a more intense dry-aged flavour.

    At the conclusion of the ageing period, the primal looses up to one third of its original mass. Then removed from the ageing room where its outer crust is trimmed, revealing its succulent, uniquely flavoursome and perfectly preserved deep red meat.


    Learn more
  • Week 1

    Entire untrimmed beef primals are placed in our uniquely specified dry-ageing room, with strict temperature, humidity and air-flow controlled requirements.

    The process of dry-aging is called proteolysis, allowing the natural breakdown of muscle protein and collagen to occur in an atmospherically controlled environment. Enzymes within are released into the meat where the breakdown process begins, allowing amino acids to act on the muscle tissue, resulting in tenderisation to take place, releasing its full flavour.

  • Week 2

    Over time as the primal cut is naturally exposed to the dry-age elements, the enzymes within the beef break down, in effect tenderising the beef.

    The primal’s entire mass further reduces in size as it continues to expel water into the specifically modified atmospheric environment where its unique concave shape begins.

  • Week 3

    The collagen continues to break down and its moisture is pushed outwards from within its core.  The front and sides of the cut aid as a waterproof barrier with its fat and bone coverage, directing evaporation to occur from out the front and rear.Typical shrinkage is approximately 10-15% in the first three weeks.

    The outer layers of the cut continue to progressively darken and harden as total moisture levels reduce.

  • Week 4

    The meat continues to further shrink as the water is expelled. The concave shape continues becomes more apparent however its fat coverage does not shrink and remains constant.

    At this point at week 4, the enzymes have played a significant role in changing the primal’s composition where the dry-aged flavour becomes clearly distinct. It is common for the aging process to cease at this point where most of the ageing process has been carried out.

  • Week 5

    Depending on customer requirements and the cut of beef used, the primal can be further aged between one or two weeks in addition to its standard four week minimum period, resulting in a more intense dry-aged flavour.

    At the conclusion of the ageing period, the primal looses up to one third of its original mass. Then removed from the ageing room where its outer crust is trimmed, revealing its succulent, uniquely flavoursome and perfectly preserved deep red meat.

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about your order

Telephone: +61 (02) 9316 8900
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